I just finished reading the last book in the Left behind series. It was
good, except it was missing one thing: Some serious editing. The rest of
the series could use some serious editing too, but the other books were
nowhere near as annoying as the last one. The thing that kept going through
my mind was: Get on with it. They spend four hundred and some odd pages
covering about a week. Definitely not worth keeping on the drive. On to
the next book. Haven’t decided what it’s going to be yet. Probably
something scientifically fictional, though.

I just finished reading the last book in the Left behind series. It was
good, except it was missing one thing: Some serious editing. The rest of
the series could use some serious editing too, but the other books were
nowhere near as annoying as the last one. The thing that kept going through
my mind was: Get on with it. They spend four hundred and some odd pages
covering about a week. Definitely not worth keeping on the drive. On to
the next book. Haven’t decided what it’s going to be yet. Probably
something scientifically fictional, though.

24 March 2004, 2:00pm ET
By Justin Hyde
ATLANTA, March 24 (Reuters) – U.S. wireless companies are wary of pouring
billions of dollars into faster networks to accommodate high-speed data,
noting
that it may be years before consumers widely adopt the technology.
High-speed wireless data technology claimed much of the limelight at this
year’s Cellular Telecommunications & Internet Association industry show
here,
but executives want more time to evaluate the technology and wait for more
advanced consumer devices, such as phones that can send and receive video
clips.
High-speed wireless data “is here, it’s here to stay and it’s going to be a
big part of our business,” Tim Donahue, Nextel Communications president and
CEO said during a panel discussion on Wednesday.
But with the telecom spending boom and bust of the past few years in mind,
several cellular companies say they want a clear picture of the high-speed
business
before they resume spending.
“We’re trying not to have a short-term memory lapse and remember where we
came from and have a viable business case,” Sprint Corp.
President and Chief Operating Officer Len Lauer said in a panel at the CTIA
show on Tuesday.
After several false starts, high-speed wireless data appears poised to take
off for two reasons. One is that the wireless industry has settled on a few
network standards that can make wireless links competitive with wired
high-speed services.

The second is that while the U.S. cellular market as a whole is still
growing, competition has begun to push down prices for its bedrock voice
service.
To avoid the fate of the traditional phone business, where declining
revenues are a fact of life, cell phone companies need another tool to keep
customers’
wallets open.
LAPTOP VS. HANDHELD
Verizon Wireless, the largest U.S. cellular company, has unveiled plans to
spend about $1 billion to roll out a high-speed data service over about 30
percent
of its network by the end of the year.
That service, known as EV-DO, will be aimed mostly at business laptop users
whose companies are willing to pay about $80 a month per user for Internet
access
speeds that can average 500 megabits per second or more.
Sprint’s Lauer said in an interview that his company will spend $1 billion
in 2005 to upgrade its network for high-speed data. But it does not expect
much
consumer demand until as late as 2006, when device manufacturers catch up.
“From our view, you can’t get a return just going after the business
market,” Lauer said. “You’ve got to get the handsets and the PDAs.”
Other than Verizon, many cellular companies have not publicly committed to a
high-speed technology for strategic reasons. Sprint seems to favor a
variation
of the technology Verizon is using, called EV-DV, that allows higher data
rates for uploads from customers — essential for swapping files like video
clips.
Nextel garnered much attention at the show with its test of a different
technology from Flarion Technologies, a spin-off of Lucent Technologies.

The Flarion wireless network can provide download speeds of about 1.5
megabits per second, with bursts up to 3 megabits — comparable to home
cable Internet
connections.
In a meeting with analysts on Tuesday, Nextel’s chief technology officer,
Barry West, did not commit Nextel to using Flarion’s technology or say when
Nextel
would roll out a high-speed data service.
But he did say the testing around Raleigh, North Carolina, was “more than a
technical trial,” and that a full roll-out
of high-speed wireless would cost Nextel roughly $2 billion.
West said Nextel was still considering other technologies, and that he had
not found a network that would let Nextel serve high-speed data for prices
similar
to DSL or cable.
The $80 per user Verizon is charging “is hard to sustain,” West said in a
panel discussion. “I think the real competition is down at the level of
cable
or DSL, with a premium for mobility.”
Copyright
2004, Lycos, Inc. All Rights Reserved. Lycos® is a registered trademark of
Carnegie Mellon University.

New info on the job front: Hurry up and wait some more. Apparently, they want to see if their software’s goign to work with Jaws before they give us any answers. From what I was told by the NT admin a few weeks ago, they’re still using the same database and interface, so what’s the deal. Who knows. To be honest, the cynical side of me says: “You’re about to take the green one.” But, we’ll see. We had an adventure with the keyboard yesterday. The down-arrow key on the craptop keyboard decided it doesn’t want to communicate anymore, and things looked bleak. But, I managed to get in touch with the techy from our local services for the blind, and he happened to have some stray keyboards laying around. He’s the man. Things could have been disasterous if he hadn’t had those keyboards, and wasn’t willing to bring one over. Those of you who use Jaws, try to do it without a down-arrow, just to see what a craptasm it is.

New info on the job front: Hurry up and wait some more. Apparently, they want to see if their software’s goign to work with Jaws before they give us any answers. From what I was told by the NT admin a few weeks ago, they’re still using the same database and interface, so what’s the deal. Who knows. To be honest, the cynical side of me says: “You’re about to take the gree one.” But, we’ll see. We had an adventure with the keyboard yesterday. The down-arrow key on the craptop keyboard decided it doesn’t want to communicate anymore, and things looked bleak. But, I managed to get in touch with the techy from our local services for the blind, and he happened to have some stray keyboards laying around. He’s the man. Things could have been disasterous if he hadn’t had those keyboards, and wasn’t willing to bring one over. Those of you who use Jaws, try to do it without a down-arrow, just to see what a craptasm it is.

Shalom all:

As the subject says, it’s the first day of Passover, about two minutes after sunrise. I always love Jewish holidays, especially Passover. This is the first Jewish holiday I ever celebrated. I didn’t get my Menorah until after my conversion, and Passover was where I got my first glimpse of Jewish communality. I spent my first Passover and participated in my first Seder with the folks from ECU Hillel, at the organizational advisor’s house. That’s where I got my first taste of matzah ball soup, matzah, kugel, and gefilteh fish. Ah, the memories. As I said, I didn’t do anything myself for Passover, but it’s still been nice to take this time to remember why we celebrate this festival to begin with: We celebrate it because G-d brought the Jewish people out of Egypt, with miracles, so we could serve him. More later.

Shalom all:

As the subject says, it’s the first day of Passover, about two minutes after sunrise. I always love Jewish holidays, especially Passover. This is the first Jewish holiday I ever celebrated. I didn’t get my Menorah until after my conversion, and Passover was where I got my first glimpse of Jewish communality. I spent my first Passover and participated in my first Seder with the folks from ECU Hillel, at the organizational advisor’s house. That’s where I got my first taste of matzah ball soup, matzah, kugel, and gefilteh fish. Ah, the memories. As I said, I didn’t do anything myself for Passover, but it’s still been nice to take this time to remember why we celebrate this festival to begin with: We celebrate it because G-d brought the Jewish people out of Egypt, with miracles, so we could serve him. More later.

Given that this is Holy Week for Christians, and given that I’m always game for a little religious humor, I thought I’d post this. This is from the Bible
in Ebonics, which, I swear, really does exist.

The Ten Commandments In Ebonics

1. I be God. Don’ be dissing me.
2. Don’ be makin hood ornaments outa me or nothin in my crib.
3. Don’ be callin me for no reason – homey don’ play that.
4. Y’all betta be in church on Sundee.
5. Don’ dis ya mama … an if ya know who ya daddy is, don’ dis him neither.
6. Don’ ice ya bros.
7. Stick to ya own woman.
8. Don’ be liftin no goods.
9. Don’ be frontin like you all that an no snitchin on ya homies.
10. Don’ be eyein’ ya homie’s crib, ride, or nothin.

Given that this is Holy Week for Christians, and given that I’m always game for a little religious humor, I thought I’d post this. This is from the Bible
in Ebonics, which, I swear, really does exist.

The Ten Commandments In Ebonics

1. I be God. Don’ be dissing me.
2. Don’ be makin hood ornaments outa me or nothin in my crib.
3. Don’ be callin me for no reason – homey don’ play that.
4. Y’all betta be in church on Sundee.
5. Don’ dis ya mama … an if ya know who ya daddy is, don’ dis him neither.
6. Don’ ice ya bros.
7. Stick to ya own woman.
8. Don’ be liftin no goods.
9. Don’ be frontin like you all that an no snitchin on ya homies.
10. Don’ be eyein’ ya homie’s crib, ride, or nothin.

Well folks, looks like we get to keep the hair. It turns out that using shampoo with conditioner in it already is a bad thing, because it doesn’t really condition your hair like separate conditioner would. Got my grocery shopping done today. No Pesach items, but we’ll think of something to commemorate the festival.

Well folks, looks like we get to keep the hair. It turns out that using shampoo with conditioner in it already is a bad thing, because it doesn’t really condition your hair like separate conditioner would. Got my grocery shopping done today. No Pesach items, but we’ll think of something to commemorate the festival.

Looks like I have to go get a haircut sooner than possible. I’ve got a huge knot in my hair, and I have no idea how it got there, because I always make it a point to brush my hair out thoroughly. I didn’t notice it until yesterday morning, when I got out of the shower, and went to brush my hair. I’ve gotten most of it out, but my head, neck, shoulders and back are killing me now. because of where it’s at, and because of how long my hair is, I have to flip it up and over my face to completely brush it out, and keep it from tangling. So I’ve spent the last day or so trying to get this damned tangle out, and I’m just not making very much progress. So I’m going to Walmart to get this taken care of. That’s going to cost me $19 in cab fair alone, plus the price for the haircut. I’m really hoping something good can come out of this. I may only have to cut my bangs, (which are about shoulder-length), but as long as it doesn’t get any worse than that, I suppose I can deal. Maybe they have some sort of miracle detangler or something. Everybody keep your fingers crossed, or hope, or pray, (or whatever you do), that I don’t have to completely destroy my hair today.

Pesach (Passover) starts tomorrow night, and, for the first time since I first started studying for my conversion to Judaism, I’m not doing anything for the festival. Not that I’ve ever gotten the chance to go all-out, (have a huge meal for the Seder, or Passover service which takes place in the home, around the table, have a ton of people over to enjoy it, have plenty of Passover delecacies), but to do nothing is weird. While I’m at Walmart, I’ll see if I can pick up a few things. I’ll keep you guys posted on all this. Maybe it’ll all turn out better than I’m expecting. Things do that sometimes.

Looks like I have to go get a haircut sooner than possible. I’ve got a huge knot in my hair, and I have no idea how it got there, because I always make it a point to brush my hair out thoroughly. I didn’t notice it until yesterday morning, when I got out of the shower, and went to brush my hair. I’ve gotten most of it out, but my head, neck, shoulders and back are killing me now. because of where it’s at, and because of how long my hair is, I have to flip it up and over my face to completely brush it out, and keep it from tangling. So I’ve spent the last day or so trying to get this damned tangle out, and I’m just not making very much progress. So I’m going to Walmart to get this taken care of. That’s going to cost me $19 in cab fair alone, plus the price for the haircut. I’m really hoping something good can come out of this. I may only have to cut my bangs, (which are about shoulder-length), but as long as it doesn’t get any worse than that, I suppose I can deal. Maybe they have some sort of miracle detangler or something. Everybody keep your fingers crossed, or hope, or pray, (or whatever you do), that I don’t have to completely destroy my hair today.

Pesach (Passover) starts tomorrow night, and, for the first time since I first started studying for my conversion to Judaism, I’m not doing anything for the festival. Not that I’ve ever gotten the chance to go all-out, (have a huge meal for the Seder, or Passover service which takes place in the home, around the table, have a ton of people over to enjoy it, have plenty of Passover delecacies), but to do nothing is weird. While I’m at Walmart, I’ll see if I can pick up a few things. I’ll keep you guys posted on all this. Maybe it’ll all turn out better than I’m expecting. Things do that sometimes.

Shalom all:

It’s time for me to regale you with yet more tales from the steak house, which could also be classified as bobular blunders. As the above suggests, Ray and I went to Ryans again last night, and the food was considerably better. Note to self: Don’t go to Ryans, or any other restaurant for that matter, any later than two hours before they close. we ended up going after making a trip to the Sprint Store to have our phones configured with reliable sighted assistance. Bob would not have been good for that one. Things would have straight down the drain, without delay at that point. So anyway, we get the phones configured, and then go get some dinner. Begin bobular blunders. We sit down at the table, and Bob starts to discuss the current case of the cross-burning, and oppines that a man who happened to be a witness to the crime, and didn’t stop it, got too harshly judged. Apparently, eight years in jail, where you have cable and ‘net access, and eat better than a lot of people on the outside is just too much to deal with. Then, the conversation spirals down to the statement, made by Bob, that the law is as corrupt as could be, and that someone who witnesses a crime and does nothing is not as guilty as the other miscreants involved. Furthermore, when I brought up biblical support, (Bob relies heavily on the King James translation of the Bible for the underpinnings of a lot of the choices he makes and encourages others to make), for the concept of guilt by association in a case like that, Bob promptly declared that “do not stand idly by while your brother’s blood is shed” is a spiritual law as opposed to a civil law. That tends to be the way a lot of Christians, though not all, explain away the non-ceremonial requirements, (which, consequently, make up the majority of what Christians like to refer to as “the law”), when confronted with the question of why they don’t follow the law when Jesus specifically commanded it, or when you ask them how Jesus was supposed to have fulfilled commandments like that. But, I seriously digress. The point is, a statement like “do not stand idly by while your brother’s blood is shed” is very obviously a civil law, even if one does not take the time to look the verse up within its proper context. Ray didn’t say much during this point of the conversation, which I find interesting, given that Ray has an oppinion on most things. As the evening progressed, the conversation spiraled to yet new levels of depravity. Bob decided to tell Ray and I a story about a local woman, in her late twenties, who married a man in his eighties. He extolled this as right and proper. In order to impress upon you all the complete depravity and perversity of a statement like that, (yes, Bob has a nack for special nack for taking a situation or idea that’s already depraved in and of itself, and bringing it to new and completely unfathomable depths of indecency), I need to give you a little background. It goes without saying that Bob holds some extremely screwed up views. For instance: Vlind people all have bad childhoods by default; blind people shouldn’t date other blind people because, if they get married and spend the rest of their lives together, they become ultradependent; blind people have an extra license to sin than the rest of society because we’re all frustrated, lonely people who need some sort of opiate; and so on, etcetera. So, when Bob suggested that said woman did the right thing by marrying the octagenarian, neither Ray nor I were surprised, although it does continue to shock me, at least, every time I hear views like that expressed. This stems from Bob’s view that women need to date older men because men their age are going to just screw them over. Well, OK, I can’t say that one’s totally flawed. But, the way it gets borne out is disturbing. I date older men, but there’s a limit: Namely, anyone older than nine or ten years is excluded due to the fact that the number of commonalities starts to dwindle, and at that point, we’re getting a little too close to the generational gap. “Who’s your daddy” is not a line I want to hear, especially when it’s coming from someone who is supposed to be playing a totally different role. Fortunately, thanks to the ending of dinner, the conversation didn’t have any more oportunity to downgrade any further. Ray and I got back here, and promptly tuned in to No Holds barred Radio, and listened to the further torture of Ellis 2.0. Watch this space for more on that. Because I’ve spent the last little while on this entry, and I’m not sure, after reporting last night’s episode, you can really add other, unrelated incidents to the same entry, I’ll go for now. Thanks for reading.

Shalom all:

It’s time for me to regale you with yet more tales from the steak house, which could also be classified as bobular blunders. As the above suggests, Ray and I went to Ryans again last night, and the food was considerably better. Note to self: Don’t go to Ryans, or any other restaurant for that matter, any later than two hours before they close. we ended up going after making a trip to the Sprint Store to have our phones configured with reliable sighted assistance. Bob would not have been good for that one. Things would have straight down the drain, without delay at that point. So anyway, we get the phones configured, and then go get some dinner. Begin bobular blunders. We sit down at the table, and Bob starts to discuss the current case of the cross-burning, and oppines that a man who happened to be a witness to the crime, and didn’t stop it, got too harshly judged. Apparently, eight years in jail, where you have cable and ‘net access, and eat better than a lot of people on the outside is just too much to deal with. Then, the conversation spirals down to the statement, made by Bob, that the law is as corrupt as could be, and that someone who witnesses a crime and does nothing is not as guilty as the other miscreants involved. Furthermore, when I brought up biblical support, (Bob relies heavily on the King James translation of the Bible for the underpinnings of a lot of the choices he makes and encourages others to make), for the concept of guilt by association in a case like that, Bob promptly declared that “do not stand idly by while your brother’s blood is shed” is a spiritual law as opposed to a civil law. That tends to be the way a lot of Christians, though not all, explain away the non-ceremonial requirements, (which, consequently, make up the majority of what Christians like to refer to as “the law”), when confronted with the question of why they don’t follow the law when Jesus specifically commanded it, or when you ask them how Jesus was supposed to have fulfilled commandments like that. But, I seriously digress. The point is, a statement like “do not stand idly by while your brother’s blood is shed” is very obviously a civil law, even if one does not take the time to look the verse up within its proper context. Ray didn’t say much during this point of the conversation, which I find interesting, given that Ray has an oppinion on most things. As the evening progressed, the conversation spiraled to yet new levels of depravity. Bob decided to tell Ray and I a story about a local woman, in her late twenties, who married a man in his eighties. He extolled this as right and proper. In order to impress upon you all the complete depravity and perversity of a statement like that, (yes, Bob has a nack for special nack for taking a situation or idea that’s already depraved in and of itself, and bringing it to new and completely unfathomable depths of indecency), I need to give you a little background. It goes without saying that Bob holds some extremely screwed up views. For instance: Vlind people all have bad childhoods by default; blind people shouldn’t date other blind people because, if they get married and spend the rest of their lives together, they become ultradependent; blind people have an extra license to sin than the rest of society because we’re all frustrated, lonely people who need some sort of opiate; and so on, etcetera. So, when Bob suggested that said woman did the right thing by marrying the octagenarian, neither Ray nor I were surprised, although it does continue to shock me, at least, every time I hear views like that expressed. This stems from Bob’s view that women need to date older men because men their age are going to just screw them over. Well, OK, I can’t say that one’s totally flawed. But, the way it gets borne out is disturbing. I date older men, but there’s a limit: Namely, anyone older than nine or ten years is excluded due to the fact that the number of commonalities starts to dwindle, and at that point, we’re getting a little too close to the generational gap. “Who’s your daddy” is not a line I want to hear, especially when it’s coming from someone who is supposed to be playing a totally different role. Fortunately, thanks to the ending of dinner, the conversation didn’t have any more oportunity to downgrade any further. Ray and I got back here, and promptly tuned in to No Holds barred Radio, and listened to the further torture of Ellis 2.0. Watch this space for more on that. Because I’ve spent the last little while on this entry, and I’m not sure, after reporting last night’s episode, you can really add other, unrelated incidents to the same entry, I’ll go for now. Thanks for reading.